Jewish Music for Flexible Flute Ensemble

$24.00

Jewish Music for Flexible Flute Ensemble (for 2,3,4 or more)
arr. Phyllis Avidan Louke
pub. ALRY Publications   

The music in Jewish Music for Flexible Flute Ensemble was arranged specifically to provide maximum flexibility in the number of parts required to provide a successful ensemble experience and an effective performance.  These arrangements work well for ensembles of mixed abilities, as well as student ensembles.  Flute Descant is included for more advanced players.  In addition, chord symbols are included to provide even more performance combinations by adding guitar or piano.

These arrangements can be performed as a

  • Duet—use Flute 1 (melody) & Flute 2
  • Trio—use Flute 1, Flute 2, & Flute 4
  • Quartet—use Flute 1, Flute 2, Flute 3 & Flute 4
  • Flute Choir—use Flute 1, 2, 3, 4, Alto Flute and/or Bass Flute
  • Flute Descant can be added to any of the above combinations
  • Guitar or Piano could be added to any of the above combinations

The music in Jewish Music for Flexible Flute Ensemble is effective with multiple players on each part, as well as with only one on each part.  With larger groups, a piccolo may be added to Flute 1 and/or Flute Descant, if desired.  More advanced groups can perform these pieces successfully with minimal rehearsal time.

Each piece approximately 1:30
Level 2 to 3

Description

Jewish Music for Flexible Flute Ensemble (for 2,3,4 or more)
arr. Phyllis Avidan Louke, pub. ALRY Publications   

The music in Jewish Music for Flexible Flute Ensemble was arranged specifically to provide maximum flexibility in the number of parts required to provide a successful ensemble experience and an effective performance.  These arrangements work well for ensembles of mixed abilities, as well as student ensembles.  Flute Descant is included for more advanced players.  In addition, chord symbols are included to provide even more performance combinations by adding guitar or piano.

These arrangements can be performed as a

  • Duet—use Flute 1 (melody) & Flute 2
  • Trio—use Flute 1, Flute 2, & Flute 4
  • Quartet—use Flute 1, Flute 2, Flute 3 & Flute 4
  • Flute Choir—use Flute 1, 2, 3, 4, Alto Flute and/or Bass Flute
  • Flute Descant can be added to any of the above combinations
  • Guitar or Piano could be added to any of the above combinations

The music in Jewish Music for Flexible Flute Ensemble is effective with multiple players on each part, as well as with only one on each part.  With larger groups, a piccolo may be added to Flute 1 and/or Flute Descant, if desired.  More advanced groups can perform these pieces successfully with minimal rehearsal time.

Each piece approximately 1:30
Level 2 to 3

Music includes:

  1. Havah Nagilah (Let’s Be Happy)–Israel Folk Dance:   Also can be translated “Come let us rejoice and be glad”.  Song and dance are called for on joyous occasions.  This song has become one of the most popular songs of the folk repertoire.
  2. Hatikvah (The Hope)–Israeli National Anthem:  In 1897 Hatikvah became the Zionist National Anthem.  it is now the national anthem of the State of Israel.  The song says:  So long as still within the inmost heart a Jewish spirit sings, so long as the eye looks eastward, gazing toward Zion, our hope is not lost–that  hope of two thousand years, to be a free people in our land, the land of Zion     and Jerusalem.
  3. Hinei Mah Tov (How Good It Is)–Traditional Round:  The words for both versions of this song come from Psalm 133, written by King David:  Behold how good and pleasant it is for brothers to dwell together.  The first version of this song is traditionally played as a round, while the second version is a more upbeat dance tune.
  4. Hinei Mah Tov (fast)–Traditional Chassidic Folk Tune    
  5. David Melech Yisrael (David, King of Israel)–Traditional Folk Tune:  A traditional folk song that proclaims that David, King of Israel, lives forever.
  6. Tum, Balalaika (Play Balalaika)–Yiddish Folk Song:  This is a Yiddish folk song in popular riddle form.  Before proposing, a young man questions his bride’s wisdom.  He calls to the Balalaika (a guitar-like instrument popular in Eastern Europe and Russia) to play and add to the merriment of  the occasion.
  7. Heveinu Shalom Alechem (We Bring You Peace)–Traditional Hebrew Greeting Song:  This song is a song of welcome.
  8. Zum Galli Galli (We Are Proud to Be Pioneers)–Israeli Song:  The pioneers of modern Israel felt that working the land enhanced their lives and in turn, the pioneers added dignity to labor.  Zum Galli has no specific meaning—it is similar to “la la la”.  The translation of the lyrics is “The pioneers work the land”.
  9. Ayn Kaylohaynu (There is None Like Our G-d)–Traditional from Hebrew Liturgy:  This song is generally used for the closing of the Sabbath Service and was composed around the eighth century.
  10. Siman Tov Umazel Tov–(Good sign and good luck)–Traditional Song of Congratulations:  This song is sung following a joyous occasion such as a wedding or Bar/Bat Mitzvah.  The joyous message of ‘good luck’ is generally accompanied by loud clapping.  “A good sign, good luck.   May Providence smile upon you and may good luck and good fortune be yours.”
  11. Lo Yisa Goi (Nation Shall Not Lift Up Sword Against Nation)–Traditional Folk Tune:  The words to this song come from Isaiah:  Nation shall not lift up sword against nation; neither shall they learn war any more.
  12. Chag Purim (Purim time)–Traditional Folk Song for the Festival of Purim:  Purim is a festive holiday for the Jewish people.  There are masks, noisemakers (groggers), songs and dances. 
  13. Eliyahu Hanavi (Elijah the Prophet)–Traditional Folk Song for the Holiday of Passover:  Elijah the prophet has been associated with the messianic hopes of the Jewish people. This song is sung at the conclusion of the Sabbath and during the Passover Seder to express the desire that the spirit of love, peace and freedom will be possible for all people.
  14. Dayeinu (It would be enough)–Traditional Folk Song for the Holiday of Passover:  Traditionally sung during the Passover Seder, this song reminds us of the wonderful gifts God bestowed upon the Jewish people during their journey from slavery to freedom.  “However, if God had done just one of them, it would have been enough.”  This song is not limited solely to Passover.  We praise God and proclaim that if HE had performed only the act of taking us out of Egypt, it would have been enough for us.
  15. Avinu Malkeinu (Our Father, Our King)–Traditional Chassidic Melody for the Sacred Holiday of Yom Kippur (The Day of Antonement):  This prayer is a central part of the High Holy Days liturgy.  “Our father, our King, be gracious unto us and answer us, for we are wanting in good deeds.  Treat us with kindess and charity and redeem us.”  Avinu Malkeinu dates from between the 2nd and 6th centuries.

Additional information

Weight 7 oz
Dimensions 9 x 12 x .25 in

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